The powerful play goes on.

I love cable. One morning. One very early morning. One very early morning after eating breakfast. One very early morning after eating breakfast, after taking a bath and after getting dressed. I turned on the television and watched National Geographic Channel. The show featured the cuttlefish. Those underwater creatures were just adorable.

The people were doing some kind of research with the cuttlefish. Trying to prove that the cuttlefish are intelligent. More intelligent than the octopus. I have to say I was impressed. Phoebe couldnt even play dead. She couldnt even do tricks other than fetch and stand up (and that's if and ONLY if you have food). The cuttlefish has amazing camouflage skills and very interesting mating behaviors too. There are emerging new studies on the intelligence of these creatures. Im trying to find a video copy of those experiments over the net but couldnt find one. The following link provides useful information and interactive sites about the behaviors of cuttlefish (plus other equally interesting animals) :

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/camo/


We could learn a lot from animals. In several years of watching National Geographic, I found certain similarities of certain animals with human beings. You see, even though we are the most intelligent creatures on Earth, there are far greater things that animals can do that we couldn't--that make us look somewhat stupid too. We wish to fly--we can't. We wish to breathe underwater--we can't. Animals, on the other hand, (excluding humans) cannot think as much as we can. Actually, they cannot THINK like us. They can't write nor read. They can't build skycrapers. They can't cook. They can't even flush the toilet! (with the exception of dogs and cats who were trained of course).;)

If there is one thing most common in all of us--we all have this instinct to survive. The same philosophy holds true: "The name of the game of life is survival of the fittest."

A few days ago, I started reading Yann Martel's Life of Pi. The author describes another interesting animal in the first few pages of the book--the three-toed sloth. Pi, the main character also has extensive knowledge about animals because he's a zookeeper's son. Anyway, I did some research about three-toed sloth. Just like the cuttlefish, one will find so much more interest in these animals than, i don't know, in just sleeping or in computer games. haha. (although i would contradict this contention of mine later). :p

Three-toed sloths are the world's slowest mammal--no mystery in there anymore i guess. The name says it. Now, isnt that glorifying? Spending your time just "hanging around"--literally? hehe. Read more:

http://animals.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mammals/three-toed-sloth.html

It is so fascinating to know that there is so much to learn around us. Unfortunately, oftentimes we neglect our opportunities to learn. It's amazing what you will find one morning when you wake up and just open a book and read..Or turn on the television and watch National Geographic or any other educational programs for that matter.

We are the only living creatures who CAN read. Who CAN learn. Who can watch a National Geographic episode. Who can subscribe to cable and watch National Geographic episodes.wehe

And who CAN share what they learn.

It's time we exercise our brains and make intelligent choices. A little dose of sappy programs and films (once in awhile) wouldnt hurt though. They still keep the human brain sane. ;p

"...That you are here - That life exists and identity. That the powerful play goes on, and you may contribute a verse." -Walt Whitman.


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